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Saturday, May 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of Biology and control of the hackberry nipple and blister gall makers found in the catalog.

Biology and control of the hackberry nipple and blister gall makers

James E Appleby

Biology and control of the hackberry nipple and blister gall makers

by James E Appleby

  • 45 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station in Wooster, Ohio .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Adelgidae -- Control,
  • Hackberry -- Diseases and pests -- Control

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJames E. Appleby and R.B. Neiswander
    SeriesResearch circular / Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station -- 111, Research circular (Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station) -- 111
    ContributionsNeiswander, R. B. 1898-
    The Physical Object
    Pagination23, [1] p. :
    Number of Pages23
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15228517M

    Leaves of hackberry trees often have the hackberry nipple gall, caused by an insect called a psyllid. Elms often get galls such as the cockscomb gall, caused by an aphid. This irregular gall looks. Plant galls are "abnormal" structures that develop in the cells, tissues, or organs of a plant ONLY when it is colonized by certain parasitic organisms such as bacteria, fungi, nematodes, mites, or insects. These gall-makers are collectively known as cecidozoa.. They usually secrete enzymes or plant hormones that stimulate hypertrophy (over-growth) and/or hyperplasy (cell proliferation) in.

    Ecological Communities - edited by Takayuki Ohgushi January Hackberry nipple gall parasitoid photos and facts including description, habitat, food, breeding, conservation status Hackberry nipple gall parasitoid (Eurytoma semivenae) Hackberry nipple gall parasitoid (Eurytoma semivenae) damage Photograph by USDA Forest Service - Northeastern Area Archive, USDA Forest Service,

    Leaves of hackberry trees often have the hackberry nipple gall, caused by an insect called a psyllid. Elms often get galls such as the cockscomb gall, caused by an aphid. This irregular gall looks like rooster's combs on the leaves. Figure 2: Hackberry nipple gall caused by a psyllid: Maple bladder gall caused by an eriophyid mite. Figure 3: Hackberry blister gall caused by a psyllid. Figure 4: Poplar petiole gall caused by an aphid. Figure 5: Jumping oak gall caused by a gall wasp. Figure 6. Erineum gall .


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Biology and control of the hackberry nipple and blister gall makers by James E Appleby Download PDF EPUB FB2

BIOLOGY and CONTROL of the HACKBERRY NIPPLE and BLISTER GALL MAKERS JAMES E. APPLEBY and R. NEISWANDER INTRODUCTION Members of the family Psyllidae (Chermidae), order Homopter d, commonly called the jumping plant lice, are small insects usually mea­ suring not over 1/5 of an inch in length.

The family contains 17 genera. observations on the life histories and control of the hackberry psyllids at Manhattan extending over an eight-year period. The insects of the genus Pachypsylla (PsyllidaerHomoptera), commonly known as hackberry psyllids, are all gall makers on the hackberry tree and are restricted in range, as is the hackberry, to the continent of North America.

Gall makers may live within individual chambers or within commu- Hackberry Blister, nipple, petiole, bud gall and others Top-shaped galls on undersides of leaves Pachypsylla spp.

to gall-making insects and mites. Should a susceptible plant already be in place, good horticultural practices. Biology and control of the hackberry nipple and blister gall makers / (Wooster, Ohio: Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station, ), by James E.

Appleby and R. Neiswander (page images at HathiTrust; US access only). Problem: Hackberry Nipple Gall Psyllid - Pachypsylla celtidismamma Hosts: Hackberry is the only known host of this pest. Description: These galls are caused by tiny insects known as psyllids (sill-lids).

Infestations of hackberry are extremely common, but do not seriously affect the vitality of the tree, although heavily infested leaves may drop prematurely. Hackberry Nipple Gall-making Psyllid is just fun to say.

The name also suggests that these are the cause the small, discolored nodes called nipple galls that are so common on the undersides of hackberry leaves.

Psyllids are a group of small insects called jump-ing plant lice, and the name fits. They are tiny, plen-File Size: KB. Elm Bladder or finger-type leaf galls Mite, Eriophyes ulmi Ficus Leaf folding and rolling Cuban laurel thrips Grape Galls on roots Grape phylloxera Hackberry Blister, nipple, petiole, bud gall and others Pachypsylla spp.

Top-shaped galls on undersides of leaves Cecicdomyid fly Hickory, pecan Petiole and leaf stipule galls Phylloxera spp. A number of psyllid species occur on hackberry, including the hackberry nipple gall maker, the hackberry blister gall maker, and the hackberry bud gall maker.

Galls are unsightly and occasionally cause premature leaf drop, but they do not appear to affect tree health. Life cycle: Common leaf gall forming species overwinter in the adult stage in bark cracks and crevices.

As an empirical test of this observation, the relationship between the density of hackberry nipplegall makers, Pachypsylla celtidismamma (Fletcher), on hackberry, Celtis occidentalis L., and. Several types of insects cause serious abnormalities and growths on plant tissue, such as the oak leaf gall midge, the hickory stem/leaf gall phylloxeran, and the bullet gall wasp.

Generally. Common Name: Hackberry gall psyllid Scientific Name: Pachypsylla sp. Order: Homoptera Description: Galls appear as 1/8 to 1/4 inch swellings of tissue on leaves or can be carefully cut open to reveal the pale, developing psyllid inside.

Adults resemble tiny (3/16 inch long) cicadas and they can become abundant in the fall when they are attracted to homes, often crawling through. Change in proportion of centre- to side-cell females of hackberry leaf gall-makers at Beltsville, Maryland, in the spring of Numbers in parentheses below each date indicate total number of.

This midge seems to cause a general unhealthy appearance in trees but it is localized to small areas. Phytophaga painteri causes a gall on the undersides of hackberry leaves.

Other galls caused by midges include the gouty vein gall on maple, the maple leaf spot gall, the ash midrib gall, and the pine needle gall. Hackberry Nipple Galls By Jeff Rugg. May 2, 4 min read. Tweet.

lifestyle home and garden plants landscape hackberry nipple gall witches'-broom flowering trees. About Jeff. Hackberry Blister, nipple, petiole, bud gall and others Pachypsylla spp. Top-shaped galls on undersides of leaves Cecicdomyid fl y Hickory, pecan Petiole and leaf stipule galls Phylloxera spp.

Oaks Leaf vein pocket gall Fly gall Woody twig galls Gouty oak and horned oak gall wasps Leaf galls with orangish “hair” Hedgehog gall wasp. The Hackberry nipple-gall maker insects (or gnats) are emerging from eggs on leaves in South Central Texas and trying to get inside where it is warmer.

Click for a hub of Extension resources related to the current COVID situation. From the U of M Extension site, and from other states' sites, I have learned that the galls are not harmful to the trees, and could be ignored. Sometimes spraying the trees helps.

A Nebraska Extension site mentions Bayer Advanced Garden Tree & Shrub Control, which is not sprayed, but poured around the base of the affected tree in early Spring. Jewelweed Gall Midges. Abnormal plant growths called galls come in all sizes and shapes, are found on leaves, buds and stems, and are caused by a number of agents, including insects.

A majority of insect galls are caused by the eggs and developing larvae of flies, wasps and midges. Pachypsylla is a genus of tiny insects that grow up inside galls that form on hackberry leaves. Like other gall makers, Pachypsylla adults lay their eggs on leaves, which then start to swell around the egg or developing larva, forming a gall.

After feeding on the gall tissue all summer, Pachypsylla adults emerge in the fall. Hosts (Back to Top). Two trees in the family Celtidaceae are hosts for the hackberry petiole gall psyllid. These are hackberry, Celtis occidentalis L., and sugarberry, Celtis laevigata Willd. Figure 7.

Hackberry, Celtis occidentalis L. (Celtidaceae), is a host for the hackberry petiole gall psyllid, Pachypsylla venusta (Osten-Sacken). Photograph by Don Hall, University of Florida. This bulletin describes three hackberry galls, the insects which make them, and 19 of their natural enemies in the Cayuga Valley near Ithaca, N.Y.

Two galls were caused by psyllids and the third by a cecidomyiid. The taxonomy, biology, morphology, and distribu- tion of the species are by: 8.records it f rotn the leaf galls of Pachypsyllu crftidis-mrtm rnd (liiley) the hackberry nipple gall maker.

Atlother species, Torymus scalaris (Huber), is recorded from twig galls, Huber (), of Puch ypsyllrr s-g~r,2nzcr~trz ltiley. In Septemberseveral specimens of Torymlls were re:lred froCited by: 3.Handbook of Urban Insects and Arachnids This account provides the first comprehensive coverage of the insect and other arthropod pests in the urban environment worldwide Presented is a brief description, biology, and detailed information on the development, habits, and distribution of urban and public health pests There are illustrations to accompany some of the major pest species The.